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Eastern cougar found extinct March 2, 2011

 
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Cougardaville
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 03, 2011 1:32 am    Post subject: Eastern cougar found extinct March 2, 2011 Reply with quote

Posted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 10:02 am Post subject: Eastern cougar found extinct March 2, 2011

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service concludes eastern cougar extinct


Credit: USFWS
Bruce Wright, New Brunswick wildlife biologist and author, with what is believed to be the last eastern puma. The puma was trapped by Rosarie Morin of St. Zacharie, Quebec in Somerset County, Maine in 1938. Mounted specimen resides in the New Brunswick Museum in St. John, New Brunswick.


Although the eastern cougar has been on the endangered species list since 1973, its existence has long been questioned. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) conducted a formal review of the available information and, in a report issued today, concludes the eastern cougar is extinct and recommends the subspecies be removed from the endangered species list.

“We recognize that many people have seen cougars in the wild within the historical range of the eastern cougar,” said the Service’s Northeast Region Chief of Endangered Species Martin Miller. “However, we believe those cougars are not the eastern cougar subspecies. We found no information to support the existence of the eastern cougar.”

Reports of cougars observed in the wild examined during the review process described cougars of other subspecies, often South American subspecies, that had been held in captivity and had escaped or been released to the wild, as well as wild cougars of the western United States subspecies that had migrated eastward to the Midwest.

During the review, the Service received 573 responses to a request for scientific information about the possible existence of the eastern cougar subspecies; conducted an extensive review of U.S. and Canadian scientific literature; and requested information from the 21 States within the historical range of the subspecies. No States expressed a belief in the existence of an eastern cougar population. According to Dr. Mark McCollough, the Service’s lead scientist for the eastern cougar, the subspecies of eastern cougar has likely been extinct since the 1930s.

The Service initiated the review as part of its obligations under the Endangered Species Act. The Service will prepare a proposal to remove the eastern cougar from the endangered species list, since extinct animals are not eligible for protection under the Endangered Species Act. The proposal will be made available for public comment.

The Service's decision to declare the eastern cougar extinct does not affect the status of the Florida panther, another wild cat subspecies listed as endangered. Though the Florida panther once ranged throughout the Southeast, it now exists in less than five percent of its historic habitat and in only one breeding population of 120 to 160 animals in southwestern Florida.

Additional information about eastern cougars, including frequently asked questions and cougar sightings, is at: http://www.fws.gov/northeast/ecougar. Find information about endangered species at http://www.fws.gov/endangered.

The Service works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and a trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information about our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov.

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Seven years of dedication Studying "Cougars" taking sighting reports, Tracking & Filming the wild! Then ...enjoying Horses!

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Cougardaville
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Posted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 8:36 pm Post subject:

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Quote:
Reports of cougars observed in the wild examined during the review process described cougars of other subspecies, often South American subspecies, that had been held in captivity and had escaped or been released to the wild, as well as wild cougars of the western United States subspecies that had migrated eastward to the Midwest


[color=blue]This is exactly what I have been saying for many years here at Trackincats.com. My greatest concern was that they were being released illegally The mountain lions we have studied and the people sharing their sightings the cats are NOT showing the actions of a truly wild secretive mountain lion. The reports I get are all too similar, the cat steps out in view of a human, stars at them, no fear A few seconds later they amble off when they are done looking at you. Never are they in flight like that of a wild animal just caught by human presence. I don't and won't ever believe DEC is releasing them. I know many people claim this is why we see them. I have interviewed many people at the DEC which has convinced me they are not salting our back yards with this predator. In my opinion I don't think New York State wants this apex predator to return. If this cat is here it will need to be managed, this takes money from the budget that I am not sure we have? I would rather see money spent on the serious situation we have with coy/wolves. All creatures have a purpose in the food chain. This mountain lion eats only meat, mainly deer. Never do they eat berries, nuts, fruit, or vegetation to exist. We are saturated with coy/wolves that continue to do plenty of damage to our deer crops. Our black bear population is now very high, they also consume fawns in the spring.
Some people, the ones not spending any "real time" in the woods think we have the high numbers of deer. Why? because you see them in your back yards, near your barn, houses and roads. They will pose for you to take their pictures over and over. Again my opinion, they are living very near us increasing their chances of survival due to predation by the coy/wolf.
Mountain lions raised by humans, then released are imprinted on humans. This is irreversible. This means this cat may see you as someone that might feed or house them Ironically this means this cat can be more dangerous than that of a truly wild animal, a mountain lion even in captivity is very unpredictable. A once raised cat then released or escaped does not respect you the human as the top predator. I always want to be number one. I want that advantage over all wild animals. If you see me and I see you....run away....we will co exist just fine.
I agree with the U.S.Fish and Wildlife results of the five year study. Unfortunately we lost a species, the Eastern cougar is extinct, but there is a mountain lion roaming our parts. If there are cougar advocates that are illegally releasing these cats not only should they be prosecuted they should be very ashamed of their selfish, ignorant actions raising a animal then "tossing" it in the wild to then survive on its own. These animals do not make it and the ones that do don't have a fruitful life. You know that saying, "Don't mess with mother nature" ?
In conclusion, I believe the cougar should be removed from the endangered species list.
Cougardaville [/quote]
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Seven years of dedication Studying "Cougars" taking sighting reports, Tracking & Filming the wild! Then ...enjoying Horses!

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Tweleve years of dedication Studying "Cougars" taking sighting reports, Tracking & Filming the wild!
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